How IT companies are getting back to work in lockdown

‘Elevator rules deem no more than two people for a unit that carries six people, and as an employee enters the office, there are three masks to be used for five hours each a day, then disposed and one for the next day as well.’ 

Image used for representational purpose. Photograph: Danish Siddiqui/Reuters.

Corporates, mostly in the technology sector, have hit the reset button on how they will work as they open up phase by phase and their employees get back to work. 

Some of the new norms include a brand new set of standard operating procedures (SOPs) along with revamping existing office infrastructure, among others. 

Harsh Goenka, chairman of the RPG Group, which saw about 30 per cent of its 30,000 employees across different businesses and geographies, back at work, said, “The cautious balancing of safety norms, while targeting maximum business efficiency, is going to be the new challenge of our times.” 

 

RPG’s technology company Zensar Technologies, which employs around 8,500 people, is operating at 100 per cent capacity with only 50 per cent of employees attending office. In addition to distancing and other protocols, it is also organising private buses as well as cars to transport employees back and forth from office.

While manufacturing companies are also opening in accordance with the government’s directive, it’s mostly the information technology and services firms that are opening corporate offices. 

Aruna Jayanthi, head of Asia-Pacific and Latin America, of consulting firm , said that SOPs for employees begin right from the time the employee leaves the house. “If it’s a cab they are taking to come to office, then only one person is allowed in the vehicle and the person must sit diagonally opposite the driver,” she said. 

“Elevator rules deem no more than two people for a unit that carries six people, and as an employee enters the office, there are three masks to be used for five hours each a day, then disposed and one for the next day as well.” 

Capgemini, which employs about 110,000 in , has seen about 5 per cent of its workers coming back to office. 

In addition, certain desk areas have been cordoned off and there are some that have been marked off to not be used. The limited use of office facilities is being practiced by more and more firms. 

“No big meeting rooms, no cafeterias, and no visitors inside the office,” cautions Goenka, as he goes on to say that for some industries, many…

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