Global economy to plunge into worst recession since WW-II: World Bank

Activity among advanced economies is anticipated to shrink by seven per cent in 2020 as domestic demand and supply, trade and finance have been severely disrupted.

The global economy, which has plunged into a severe contraction, will shrink by 5.2 per cent this year due to the massive shock of the coronavirus pandemic and the shutdown measures to contain it, the World Bank said on Monday.

The COVID-19 recession is the first since 1870 to be triggered solely by a pandemic, World Bank president David Malpass said in his foreword to the latest edition of the Global Economic Prospect report released on Monday.

 

“The speed and depth with which it has struck, suggests the possibility of a sluggish recovery that may require policymakers to consider additional interventions,” he said.

For many emerging markets and developing countries, however, effective financial support and mitigation measures are particularly hard to achieve because a substantial share of employment is in informal sectors, the president of the Washington-based multilateral lender said.

According to the report, economic activity among advanced economies is anticipated to shrink by seven per cent in 2020 as domestic demand and supply, trade and finance have been severely disrupted.

Emerging Markets and Developing Economies (EMDEs) are expected to shrink by 2.5 per cent this year, their first contraction as a group in at least 60 years, it said.

Per capita incomes are expected to decline by 3.6 per cent, which will tip millions of people into extreme poverty this year, according to the report.

The blow is hitting hardest in countries where the pandemic has been the most severe and where there is heavy reliance on global trade, tourism, commodity exports and external financing, it said.

While the magnitude of the disruption will vary from region to region, all EMDEs have vulnerabilities that are magnified by external shocks.

Moreover, interruptions in schooling and primary healthcare access are likely to have lasting impacts on human capital development, the bank said.

“This is a deeply sobering outlook, with the crisis likely to leave long-lasting scars and pose major global challenges,” World Bank Group vice president for Equitable Growth, Finance and Institutions, Ceyla Pazarbasioglu said.

“Our first order of business is to address the global health and economic emergency.

“Beyond that, the global community must unite to find ways to rebuild as robust a recovery as possible to prevent…

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